Mandatory Jurisdiction

We can’t say it better than Mack Sperling did about eight months ago:  "If you are thinking of designating a case to the Business Court because the Complaint raises allegations that the corporate veil should be pierced, stop.  Those types of allegations, without more, aren’t enough to invoke the mandatory jurisdiction of the Court. "

In

The Court granted an Opposition to Notice of Designation of Action as a Mandatory Complex Business case, ruling that:

This matter appears on the face of the pleadings to involve enforcement of a restrictive covenant contained in a settlement agreement. No additional issues involving the identification, delineation and protection of trade secrets appear from the

The Court denied a motion opposing the designation of this case as a mandatory business case, holding that "this matter is a derivative action by a minority shareholder which involves issues relating to the law governing corporations," therefore "conclud[ing] that the allegations in the Complaint fall within the mandatory jurisdiction of the Business Court."

Full

The Court overruled an opposition to designation in a case involving "real estate developments which failed during the current financial crisis."

The Court found these types of cases "especially suited" for consideration by the Business Court because "(1) they involve numerous parties, (2) they involve complex issues, (3) they involve current issues relating to real

If you are thinking of designating a case to the Business Court because the Complaint raises allegations that the corporate veil should be pierced, stop.  Those types of allegations, without more, aren’t enough to invoke the mandatory jurisdiction of the Court. 

There was a short order on that subject yesterday in CCE Development Corp. v.

The Business Court now has jurisdiction over utility pole disputes between communications providers and municipalities.  That surprising expansion of the Court’s jurisdiction is thanks to a new law passed at the just concluded session of the North Carolina Legislature.

New section 62-55 of the General Statutes requires a municipality that "owns or controls poles, ducts,